What is the progresso soup diet?

In this article, we are going to discuss the “Progresso soup diet”. I will discuss how this diet compares with a healthy nutritious meal and the cons of following the Progresso soup diet.

What is the progresso soup diet?

The Progresso soup diet is a diet in which you replace one to two of your meals with Progresso soup. A can of soup contains under 240 calories. Progresso soup provides a wide range of soup choices you can pick from. 

It is an easy diet to follow and does not require much effort. Other than buying the soup and heating them up, that is it. But at a low effort, is it considered healthy?

It is not necessarily a healthy choice. Switching a meal to these soups will not provide you with enough nutrients that your body needs. Some soup cans videos contain even lower amounts of nutrients, vitamins, and minerals. 

You will be removing a healthy meal packed with protein, vitamins, and minerals for a much less nutritious option. 

If you are having chicken with grilled vegetables, for example, you will be getting loads of protein and fiber from this one meal. It provides B vitamins, and potassium depending on the type of vegetable you pick. 

If it is compared with a can of Progresso soup, you will not get the amount of protein, fiber, or vitamins from it. It is mostly made from herbs, some added vegetables, and carbs. 

The soup also packs a considerably high amount of salt. The recommended intake of sodium is 2300 milligrams as the upper limit of what you should be consuming. This equates to almost a teaspoon per day. 

The amount of salt will be exceeded if you have Progresso soup, to be exact if you have two cans of Progresso soup per day. Sodium is linked to many health issues and should be reduced in people with heart issues, or high blood pressure.

The Progresso diet is considered a fad diet if analyzed. The diet does limit your calorie intake and restricts them to two meals which are almost 65% of your calories. It limits your option to a can of soup per meal.

 If a can of soup varies between 80 to 200 calories on average. This means the diet will provide 400 calories for two meals. It is not enough to have 200 calories worth of food per meal. It is not satisfactory, nor will it give you nutritional benefits. 

The diet thus contains such low calories, with almost 1000 calories a day it is natural to lose weight fast. But that does not mean it is healthy or good in any way. Quick weight loss in a short period of time, will be regained after the diet is stopped.

 This diet is a fad diet because of the promise of weight loss it gives for a short period of time without any scientific evidence that backs it up. The solution the diet provides is only short term not for the long term. It does not maintain the weight for a longer period of time.

What are the cons of the Progresso soup diet?

The diet does not provide much nutritional benefit to it. It is limited in nutrients. The vitamins and minerals the can of soup provides are low and not enough. The diet is also generalized and not specific for each and every person. 

The diet is high in sodium which makes it not suitable for those with health conditions. It is not appropriate for those with heart issues, or high blood pressure. The diet can easily make you consume more than the recommended salt intake in just two cans

The diet is very calorie restrictive which will lead to exhaustion and fatigue. It does not provide enough energy to carry out your day.

The diet is not clear or scientifically based. The diet does not properly explain certain aspects of it. It is also not based on any scientific studies which do not make it a trusted diet. The diet does not provide any variety in it, eating just soups for a meal or two is not enough

Conclusion 

In this article, we discussed the “Progresso soup diet”.I discussed how this diet compares with a healthy nutritious meal and the cons of following the Progresso soup diet.

References 

https://nutritionofpower.com/nutrition/progresso-soup-diet/

Progresso Soup Diet | livestrong

https://health.gov/

What was missing from this post which could have made it better?

Leave a Comment