What are the differences between a wolverine and a honey badger?

This brief guide will address the search query: “What are the differences between a wolverine and a honey badger?” Also, we’ll explore what a wolverine is, what a wolverine eats, where they’re distributed, what a honey badger is, what they eat, and where they’re distributed. 

What are the differences between a wolverine and a honey badger? 

There are many differences between wolverines and honey badgers. Notably, they’re animals from different species, distributed throughout different environments, with different physical traits and different hunting capabilities. 

Curiously, when hypothetically pitted against each other, wildlife experts and writers seem to agree that a honey badger would overcome a wolverine, due to its resilience and aggressive disposition. 

While these debates are purely hypothetical, and the likelihood of a wolverine encountering a honey badger is quite little, the topic has been addressed due to the few, relative similarities these animals show between one another. 

What is a wolverine? 

A wolverine is a carnivorous mammal of the Gulo gulo species. They are members of the Mustelidae family, which makes them related to other carnivorous mammals such as badgers, weasels, minks, ferrets, etc. 

They are the largest terrestrial members of this family and are characterized by being solitary, fierce, and pound-for-pound, are among the strongest carnivores, as they can readily take down animals many times their size.  

Physically, wolverines have a body that is close to the ground, muscled extremities, and a head that is often said to resemble that of a sleek bear’s or a fisher cat’s. 

Wolverines have measured up to 44 inches long, with tails up to 43 inches long, and height-wise, males are taller than females, with males measuring up to 37 inches tall, and females up to 18 inches tall at the withers. 

Males of up to 27.5 kilograms have been recorded, while females have been recorded as weighing up to 19 kilograms. 

What does a wolverine eat? 

As mustelids, wolverines are carnivorous. They have been known to scavenge and actively hunt, though the former is often how they source calories and sustenance in harsher seasons. 

Oftentimes, wolverines will come across a half-eaten animal themselves, or infringe upon a predator (or more than one, such as wolf packs) that is feeding and drive it off, before feeding on the carrion. 

They are capable hunters that can take down many animals such as minks, squirrels, beavers, groundhogs, moles, rabbits, rats, mice, shrews, lemmings, white deer, mule deer, wolves, lynxes, foxes, coyotes, etc. 

Curiously, wolverines are capable of hoarding food in periods of abundance and visiting these stored during harsher, winter seasons. This gives pregnant and lactating wolverines an advantage over other species, that have to hunt or graze, and in the process, expose themselves.  

Where are wolverines distributed? 

Wolverines are distributed through the northern parts of North America, Russia, and Europe. Its habitat is the sub-Arctic, boreal forests, and tundras of the northern hemisphere. 

What is a honey badger? 

A honey badger, also known as a ratel, is a mustelid. Its scientific name is Mellivora capensis, and it is also the only member of the Mellivora genus. 

Physically, honey badgers are long, their bodies can measure around 86 centimeters, and stand at roughly one foot tall at the withers. Males can weigh up to 14 kilograms, while females don’t exceed 9 kilograms in weight. 

Their fur has a white stripe that runs down the top of their heads and bodies, and tails. Honey badgers are notorious for their stubbornness and fearlessness. They face off against several animals, many of which are larger, venomous, and equally aggressive. 

What does a honey badger eat? 

Honey badgers are omnivores. They can eat tubers, berries, meat, and on occasion, even carrion. Their name alludes to their affinity for honey, and often, they pose a source of grief for apiculture and honey farmers. 

However, the bulk of their diet is made up of animal protein and fat, and they won’t shy away from eating animals such as snakes, lizards, tortoises, frogs, insects, arachnids, and rodents, birds, and even big game such as smaller types of hooved animals. 

They forage in many places for their food, often turning over stones with their sharp claws and on occasion, digging up eggs from animals that burrow and incubate their eggs. 

Near human settlements, they have become somewhat of a nuisance, as they feed on fowl, and eggs, and are notoriously aggressive, as well as difficult to dissuade. 

Where are honey badgers distributed? 

Honey badgers are distributed throughout the sub-Saharan African content, Saudi Arabia, and the southern part of the Indian subcontinent. In altitude, they can be found from 2.6 km above sea level to 4 km above sea level. 

Conclusion

In this brief guide, we’ve addressed the search query: “What are the differences between a wolverine and a honey badger?” Also, we’ve explored what a wolverine is, what a wolverine eats, where they’re distributed, what a honey badger is, what they eat, and where they’re distributed. 

References 

https://slate.com/human-interest/2013/10/animal-fights-can-a-honey-badger-win-a-fight-with-a-wolverine.html

https://sciencing.com/difference-between-badger-wolverine-8645505.html

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/facts/honey-badger

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/facts/wolverine

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