Is propel water good for you?

In this brief article, we are going to answer the question, “Is propel water good for you?”

Is propel water good for you?

Yes, propel water is good for you. Drinking propel water is essential for maintaining hydration and replacing electrolytes lost during exercise. 

When you exercise and lose fluids and electrolytes through sweat, drinking a noncarbonated water drink like Propel water that’s been fortified with antioxidants and vitamins can help.

Healthy electrolytes are provided by the sugar-free, calorie-free, as well as caffeine-free sports drink Propel. Two artificial sweeteners, sucrose and acesulfame potassium, are included, which may increase the risk of developing insulin resistance or other health problems.

The Propel Nutrition and Ingredient Analysis

The bottle declares on its label that it contains:

  • Absolutely no fruit juice
  • No calories
  • No fat content
  • Sodium (in liquid or powdered form) 150–210 mg (10% of RDA)
  • Two percent of the Recommended Daily Allowance of potassium is found in a range of 40–65 milligrammes.
  • Zero grams of carbohydrates in total.
  • A total of 0 grammes of sugar
  • No content of protein
  • 40% of the Recommended Daily Allowance of Vitamin C
  • Vitamin B3 is 50%
  • Concentration of Vitamin E is 20%
  • Vitamin B6 is 50%
  • Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) at the RDA level

Additionally, the label states that it does not contain significant amounts of fat, saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol, fiber, vitamin A, calcium, as well as iron. Considering that it’s just regular tap water with added vitamins, it makes sense.

There are other ingredients in this product besides the nutrients:

  • Hydroxycitric acid (flavoring and preserving)
  • Calcium hexametaphosphate
  • All-Natural Flavor
  • Sucralose
  • Potassium acetylsalicylate
  • calcium disodium EDTA (to protect flavor) (to protect flavor)
  • pantothenic acid calcium (vitamin B5)
  • It is a sugar-free product, but it contains artificial sweeteners.
  • The high concentration of vitamin B in Propel water is an advantage. Vitamin B is essential for optimal body functioning during high-intensity workouts and for the subsequent phase of cell repair.

What are the advantages of Propel over regular water?

You don’t need Propel water, or any electrolyte water, if you don’t exercise at all or do light workouts. The electrolytes you consume will make up for the electrolytes you lose through sweat.

Hypernatremia, or an excess of sodium in the blood, can occur if you drink nothing but propel water for months or years on end. Muscle pain, arousal, extreme thirst, confusion, seizures, and coma are all possible outcomes.

On either side, if you have an intense exercise routine, Propel water is a good choice—but only while you’re working out.

Other than sodium, Propel water contains a few questionable ingredients. The ingredients list includes things like sucralose, acesulfame potassium, as well as SHMP. Studies have shown that these are safe only when consumed in small doses, and these studies make a strong case for this recommendation.

Can Propel be Replaced by Anything More Organic?

A homemade sports drink can be made with minimal effort and store-bought ingredients.

Ingredients

A dash (0.4 g) of salt includes 155 mg of sodium.

Two tablespoons of fresh lemon juice has 31.4 milligrammes of potassium.

Take glucose as directed on the package if you need a quick source of energy. If you preload on carbohydrates or your workouts don’t last very long, you can skip this.

Regular H2O, either from the tap or a filter.

Directions

Putting together the aforementioned components yields a homemade sports drink with both the necessary electrolyte and the energy source.

As an alternative, you can use coconut water, which naturally contains electrolytes like sodium and potassium. Because of its naturally low sugar content, coconut water can be a great substitute if you can find it in the store.

Conclusion

In this brief article, we answered the question, “Is propel water good for you?”

References

https://www.livestrong.com/article/347760-what-are-the-health-benefits-of-drinking-propel-fitness-water/

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