Is peanut butter and jelly healthy?

In this brief guide, we’ll address the search query: “Is peanut butter and jelly healthy?” Also, we’ll explore how peanut butter is made, what the nutritional content of peanut butter is, how jelly is made, what the nutritional content of jelly is, and what are the contraindications for peanut butter and jelly. 

Is peanut butter and jelly healthy? 

When consumed in moderation, as part of a balanced diet and a healthy, active lifestyle, peanut butter and jelly should have no adverse effects on a person’s health. 

However, just how healthy a peanut butter and jelly sandwich is, will depend on the nutritional content of the bread used, the peanut butter, and the jelly. 

As a general rule, our readers should avoid bread that is made from refined flour, no-stir peanut butter made with hydrogenated cooking oil, and jelly that is high in refined sugars. 

A peanut butter and jelly sandwich can be an outstanding source of energy and it can be enjoyed throughout the day as a quick snack, or as a dessert. 

How is peanut butter made? 

Peanut butter is made by whittling roasted peanuts and emulsifying them with sugar, oil, salt, and on occasion, other additives that prevent the butter from separating into phases once they’ve all been mixed. 

General outlines for making peanut butter include: 

  • Shelling (peeling) harvested peanuts and cleaning away any impurities using a mesh.
  • The peanuts are then evenly roasted at 240°C with hot air. After, they’re cooled to room temperature using fast-blowing cool air.
  • Once cooled, the peanuts have their exterior peel removed with friction, and the “clean” peanuts are then ground to a paste.
  • While they’re being ground, the remainder of the ingredients can be added in, such as salt, sugar, and oil. The oil keeps the peanuts’ oil from rising to the summit of the mixture and helps it maintain a more uniform appearance.

It should be noted that quality peanut butter contains little to no additives such as preservatives or coloring agents. Also, peanut butter that has a layer of fat at the top is a more -natural- peanut butter, as it contains little hydrogenated oil–which is rich in trans fatty acids. 

What is the nutritional content of peanut butter? 

The exact nutritional content of peanut butter will depend on the brand and the ingredients the brand uses to prepare its product. However, for reference, a two-tablespoon portion of peanut butter (32 grams) will supply: 

  •  188 calories –143 of which are sourced from fat
  • 7 grams of protein
  • 16 grams of fat (25% of the recommended daily intake) – of which 3 grams are saturated fat (15% of the RDI), 3.6 grams are polyunsaturated, and 6.6 grams are polyunsaturated.
  • 7.7 grams of carbohydrates (3% of the RDI) – of which 1.8 grams are dietary fiber (7% of the RDI), and 2.1 grams are sugars
  • 152 milligrams of sodium (6% of the RDI)
  • 189 milligrams of potassium (5% of the RDI)

Additionally, the same portion of peanut butter will provide 1.3% of the recommended daily intake of calcium and 3.8% of iron. 

*Recommended daily intake values are calculated using a 2000 calories per day diet as a reference. 

How is jelly made? 

Jelly is made by processing ripe fruits and extracting juice from them, and then cooking these juices with sugars. Unlike jam, jelly isn’t made with chopped fruits, but retains their thickness. 

Jelly is made by cooking fruit juice with sugar, acid (lemon juice), and pectin. When mixed with an acid (lemon juice) the pectin begins to bind the ingredients into a gel. 

Depending on the fruit type used to make the jelly, some may require more amounts of acid, while others may require minimum amounts for the gel to set. 

Jellies can be homemade in slow cookers and kettles with a variety of ingredients, or they can be storebought in a variety of flavors. 

 What is the nutritional content of jelly? 

The exact nutritional content of jelly will depend on the fruit used to prepare it, and the amount of added sugar and other ingredients. For reference, a 21-gram portion of jelly will supply: 

  • 56 calories
  • 0 grams of protein
  • 0 grams of fat
  • 15 grams of carbohydrates (5% of the recommended daily intake) – of which 0.2 grams are dietary fiber (1% of the RDI), and 11 grams are sugars.
  • 6.3 milligrams of sodium
  • 11 milligrams of potassium 

Additionally, the same portion of jelly can provide 0.3% of the RDI of vitamin C, 0.1% of calcium, and 0.2% of iron. 

What are the contraindications for peanut butter and jelly? 

Peanut butter and jelly may be contraindicated for people with metabolic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance, and other disorders. 

This is because peanut butter and jelly are slightly high in sugars, and may interfere with a person’s calorie count or blood sugar levels. 

Also, peanut butter and jelly is contraindicated for those who have severe nut allergies, as peanuts can trigger reactions of varying severity. In extreme cases, they may lead to anaphylactic shock and require immediate medical intervention. 

We encourage our readers to mindful of their caloric necessities and intake, avoid overeating, and combine peanut butter and jelly sandwiches with a healthy diet and lifestyle. 

Conclusion

In this brief guide, we’ve addressed the search query: “Is peanut butter and jelly healthy?” Also, we’ve explored how peanut butter is made, what the nutritional content of peanut butter is, how jelly is made, what the nutritional content of jelly is, and what are the contraindications for peanut butter and jelly. 

References 

https://www.nutritionix.com/food/jelly

https://www.nutritionix.com/food/peanut-butter.

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/are-peanut-butter-and-jelly-sandwiches-healthy#making-it-healthier

https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/health-wellness/2021/10/25/peanut-butter-jelly-healthy-nutritionists-weigh-sandwich/6102633001/

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