Is 10% body fat healthy?

In this brief guide, we’ll address the search query: “Is 10% body fat healthy?” Also, we’ll explore what’s a healthy body fat percentage, what the dangers of not having a healthy amount of body fat are, and what to do if you’re out of range for a healthy level of body fat

Is 10% body fat healthy? 

Whether or not 10% body fat is healthy will depend on a person’s sex, and age group. In general, women require a higher percentage of body fat than men. 

The lowest amount of body fat that can be considered healthy for men can be as little as 3%, whereas, for women, the lowest percentage of body fat can be 10%. 

Of course, the percentage varies, and as our bodies age, our muscle mass deteriorates, and ergo, the percent of fat our bodies have, rises. 

Our readers need to make a distinction between body fat percentage, and body mass index. These terms are not interchangeable, and body fat alludes exclusively to the amount of adipose tissue, whereas the body mass index makes no distinction between adipose tissue and muscle. 

What is a healthy percent of body fat? 

A healthy percentage of body fat will depend on a person’s sex, and age group. 

For example, for men aged 20 to 39, a healthy percentage of body fat can range between 8 to 19%, whereas, for women, it can fluctuate between 21 to 32%: 

As a person ages, these percentages tend to rise. In the case of men aged 60 to 79, a healthy percentage of body fat can vary between 13 to 24%, and for women, it can be between 24 to 35%. 

It’s important to note that women have a slightly higher demand for body fat, due to their physiological requirements, such as menstrual cycles, childbirth, and other changes. 

What are the dangers of not having a healthy amount of body fat? 

The dangers of not having a healthy amount of body fat can be several. If you’re over the established limit, you’re suffering from obesity, and this implies a series of consequences on its own. 

Being obese is correlated with an increased risk of insulin resistance, liver disease, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and other physical symptoms, such as wearing out of bones, joints, and connective tissues.

Being under a healthy amount of body fat can imply malnourishment or another underlying metabolic symptom. Fat is a source of energy, and without it, our bodies can suffer detrimental effects. 

For example, women with too-low body fat can experience irregular or absent menstrual cycles, whereas both men and women can experience thyroid disorders, constant hunger, slower recovery times from injuries, decreased immune function, and other symptoms related to malnourshment. 

We encourage our readers to consult their nutritional needs with a general practitioner, who will determine what changes a patient can make to reach their ideal body fat percentage. 

What should I do if I’m out of range for a healthy level of body fat? 

Our readers should first consult with a certified medical practitioner, who will not only determine how far above or below the ideal body fat range a patient is. 

From there, a doctor will help provide a diet and if necessary, prescribe medication. With the help of a nutritionist, a patient can be veered toward a healthier diet and lifestyle. 

In the case of patients who are overweight, a doctor will indicate them to cut out foods that are full of empty calories, along with those that provide scant nutritional value and encourage them to practice aerobic exercise, for them to oxidize adipose tissue (body fat) and activate their weight loss metabolism. 

Underweight patients, conversely, may be indicated to consume foods that have more calories, such as carbohydrates, proteins, and fat. However, this weight gain should be closely monitored, to avoid exceeding the appropriate body fat limit for the patient’s age group and sex.  

We advise our readers against embarking on a diet without first seeing a specialist, as the latter will provide tailored guidance that will suit a patient’s specific, nutritional needs. 

A balanced diet, combined with a healthy, active lifestyle, is essential for those who are both under and above the ideal fat percentages to achieve healthy levels

Conclusion

In this brief guide, we’ve addressed the search query: “Is 10% body fat healthy?” Also, we’ve explored what’s a healthy body fat percentage, what the dangers of not having a healthy amount of body fat are, and what to do if you’re out of range for a healthy level of body fat

References

https://www.forbes.com/health/body/body-fat-percentage/#:~:text=It%20can%20safely%20go%20as,provided%20in%20the%20chart%20below.

https://www.livestrong.com/article/484485-what-happens-when-your-body-fat-drops-low/

https://www.healthline.com/health/fat-deficiency#bottom-line

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/body-fat-percentage-chart

https://www.healthline.com/health/exercise-fitness/ideal-body-fat-percentage

https://www.healthline.com/health/how-to-measure-body-fat

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