How much protein is there in a pork chop?

In this brief guide, we’ll address the search query: “How much protein is there in a pork chop?” Also, we’ll explore where a pork chop is cut from, what the nutritional content of a pork chop is, and what are the health benefits of eating pork chops. 

How much protein is in a pork chop? 

The exact amount of protein in a single pork chop will depend on the size (weight) of said pork chop, though on average, a 157-gram portion of pork chop will contain 40 grams of protein, and 328 calories, of which 156 are sourced from fat. 

These proportions apply to meat that has been stripped of refuse matter such as bones and cartilaginous flesh. 

Pork chops are very nutritious, averaging a little over 25% protein content, though they also have a considerable fat content.

As such, they’re recommended for low-carbohydrate dieting such as the Atkins diet and Keto.  

Where is a pork chop cut from? 

A pork chop is cut from the loin. Anatomically, this section of meat is attached to a pig’s shoulder, and to its hips at the distal end. 

Pork chops may also be known as sirloin, top loin, blade chops, loins, or ribs, depending on the region and the butcher shop, though the meat is the same and can ergo, be cooked interchangeably between recipes that use different names. 

A pig can be sourced for meat once it is 5 to 7 months old, and has a weight of 250 to 300 pounds.

Pork chops can therefore be sourced from butcher shops and convenience stores. They’re among the most popular cuts of pork meat and be cooked in a variety of ways and dishes. 

Notably, pork chops can be grilled, air-fried, sautéed, baked, and of course, they can be made into strips, pasta dishes, glazed, etc. 

What is the nutritional content of pork chops? 

On average, a 157-gram portion of pork chop will supply: 

  • 328 calories – of which 156 are sourced from fat
  • 40 grams of protein
  • 17 grams of fat (26% of the RDI) – of which 5.5 grams are saturated fat (28% of the RDI), 0.2 grams are trans fatty acids, 2.1 grams are polyunsaturated fatty acids, and 6.6 grams are monounsaturated fatty acids.
  • 0 grams of carbohydrates
  • 132 milligrams of cholesterol (44% of the recommended daily intake)
  • 86 milligrams of sodium (4% of the RDI)
  • 540 milligrams of potassium (15% of the RDI)

Additionally, the same portion can provide 02% of the RDI of vitamin A, 2.9% of calcium, and 6.9% of iron. 

*Recommended daily intake values are calculated based on a diet of 2000 calories per day. A person’s exact recommended daily intake doses may therefore vary. 

What are the health benefits of eating pork chops? 

The health benefits of eating pork chops include that it is a good source of protein, potassium, selenium, zinc, and iron. 

Proteins are essential, as our bodies source amino acids from them to make new proteins. Dietary protein deficiencies are associated with poor muscle mass, slower recovery times when healing from injuries and surgical procedures, lower immune function, and many other disorders. 

Potassium is essential, as it can help our bodies maintain healthy blood pressure levels and a steady heart rhythm. It also assists in muscle contractions, and nerve function. 

Selenium is important for our bodies, as it is a co-factor (necessary for the function) or various enzymes that regulate various processes at a cellular level. These processes include DNA synthesis, thyroid function, and by extension, metabolism regulation. 

Zinc, like selenium, is a co-factor of many enzymes and is necessary for over 300 proteins to carry out their reactions. It is important for immune function, dermal health, protein synthesis, and various biological processes. 

Iron is also essential for our bodies, as it is an important component of our red blood cells. Therefore, it is essential for the oxygenation of our organs and tissues. Iron deficiency is linked to anemia and other disorders. 

Despite these many benefits, pork chops should be ingested in moderation. This is because it is red meat and a high intake of this meat is associated with a higher risk of heart disease, and circulatory problems. 

We encourage our readers to maintain a balanced diet and a healthy, active lifestyle. 

Conclusion

In this brief guide, we’ve addressed the search query: “How much protein is there in a pork chop?” Also, we’ve explored where a pork chop is cut from, what the nutritional content of a pork chop is, and what are the health benefits of eating pork chops. 

References 

https://www.nutritionix.com/food/pork-chops

https://www.verymeaty.com/fresh-meat/pork/how-much-protein-is-in-1-pork-chop/

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/pork-chop-calories

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/zinc#benefits

https://www.healthline.com/health/iron-deficiency-anemia

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