How long are hard-boiled eggs good for in the fridge?

In this brief guide, we’ll address the search query: “How long are hard-boiled eggs good for in the fridge?” Also, we’ll explore how hard-boiled eggs are made, what happens to eggs when you boil them, what other ways eggs can be cooked in, and what are the healthiest ways to eat eggs. 

How long are hard-boiled eggs good for in the fridge?

Hard-boiled eggs can keep for up to seven days in refrigeration. Of course, this shelf-life can be shortened if they have the shell removed, or are otherwise stored in the fridge sans any other form of packaging, such as being placed on a dish and left to sit. 

Ideally, hard-boiled eggs with their shells may be covered with a bit of plastic cling wrap, as this will keep odors from other foods in the fridge from leaching onto the eggs. 

We encourage our readers to maintain a tidy and clean larder, without spills and to have their food tightly sealed in containers to preserve its freshness and organoleptic qualities, 

How are hard-boiled eggs made?

Hard-boiled eggs can be prepared by dunking eggs in boiling water for 7 to 15 minutes, though this can lead to overcooking. 

Some authors recommend steaming the eggs in a basket over a boiling kettle of water, and this can also be done in a pressure cooker. 

The quality of the water also affects how the eggs cook, as water that contains iron compounds can lead to a green ring forming around the yolk. Similarly, overcooking can also lead to the formation of this green ring, which some readers may find unappetizing. 

Also, some authors recommend using slightly aged eggs for hard-boiling, as they contain less humidity, can be peeled more easily, and are less likely to scrape or damage. 

What happens to eggs when you boil them?

When eggs are boiled, the proteins in them are denatured (broken down) and as a result, they lose their structure, lump together and harden into a mixture. This happens in both the white and the yolk, though these two parts of an egg don’t blend into one another when they’re boiled. 

In simpler terms, the heat from boiling causes the proteins in eggs to change their shape and this affects their behavior at room temperature. 

What other ways can eggs be cooked? 

Besides being hard-boiled, eggs can be baked, fried, sautéed, poached, and made into a variety of recipes that can appeal to our readers’ tastes. 

Also, eggs can be made into century eggs, a process of cooking that rather than relying on heat to denature proteins uses chemicals to transform the egg white and yolk, making them into a savory delicacy. 

Eggs are quite versatile, as they can be made into savory dishes, or they can be used as binding to make baked goods and other pastries. 

They can also be used to decorate pastry doughs by applying a layer of whisked egg with a brush as a means of varnishing baked goods such as croissants and other desserts. 

We encourage our readers to explore the many options and recipes that are available for cooking eggs. 

What are the healthiest ways to eat eggs?

The healthiest ways to eat eggs are those that have low sodium, low added fat, and a modest amount of added calories. 

This means that hard-boiling and soft-boiling may be healthier alternatives to frying and sautéeing, due to the fat necessary for the latter cooking forms. 

Also, as a general guideline, dishes with eggs should be low in calories, refined carbohydrates, and other not-so-nourishing additives. 

We encourage our readers to be mindful of their daily caloric needs and to avoid overeating. Eggs can easily be incorporated into a balanced diet and combined with a healthy, active lifestyle. 

Conclusion

In this brief guide, we’ve addressed the search query: “How long are hard-boiled eggs good for in the fridge?” Also, we’ve explored how hard-boiled eggs are made, what happens to eggs when you boil them, what other ways eggs can be cooked in, and what are the healthiest ways to eat eggs. 

References

https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how_to_make_perfect_hard_boiled_eggs/

https://www.nature.com/scitable/blog/scibytes/why_do_eggs_hardboil/#:~:text=The%20heat%20coming%20from%20your,white%20and%20yolk%20to%20harden.

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/eating-healthy-eggs#:~:text=Overall%2C%20shorter%20and%20lower%2Dheat,t%20add%20any%20unnecessary%20calories.

https://www.tastingtable.com/775325/what-is-a-century-egg-and-how-should-you-eat-it/

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